News Archive

2017

Meinhardt Group participates in third International Water Summit

Water scarcity is a growing concern for many parts of the world especially India. With a high demand for water and the existing water-related problems, the water reserves need to be replenished even faster. This trend will accelerate in some areas, as population and economic growth lead to higher water consumption.

Keeping this in mind, the government has taken several initiatives. The most ambitious plan for abatement of pollution of water was launched by the name of Ganga Action Plan. Launched on 14th June 1985 by the then Prime Minister, Shri Rajiv Gandhi, Ganga Action Plan is a holistic approach in a planned way in the direction of abatement of pollution and in turn to make our water bodies fit as a source of drinking water. Ganga Action Plan was followed by Yamuna Action Plan and now National River Conservation Plan. The pollution abatement works under NRCP presently cover identified polluted stretches of 39 major rivers in 185 towns spread over 20 States in the country. The growing concern over the issue was discussed at the third India International Water Summit held on 18 to 19 October 2012, Hotel Le Meridien, New Delhi, a workshop on Industrial Wastewater treatment and Water Usage Efficiency. Speaking on the occasion, Mr. P K Jain, Technical Advisor, Meinhardt Group said:"Water is one of the most crucial elements in our national development planning for the 21st century. The proper management of our limited water resources will be essential to avoid growing conflicts and the possibility of social unrest in the country in times to come due to water scarcity. However, the water resources on the Earth are finite. This calls for a judicious and planned use of this finite natural resource. Four R's which are of importance include Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Recover." At present, states generally plan, design and execute water supply schemes (and often operate them) through their State Departments (of Public Health Engineering or Rural Development Engineering) or State Water Boards. The Central Government assists the states by giving financial support for the centrally sponsored schemes. In order that the schemes are prepared to adopt a uniform approach, the Ministry of Urban Development has issued two manuals on water supply and treatment and on sewerage and sewage treatment. These manuals serve as a very good guide for planning and designing of water supply systems for urban and rural population and for sewerage and storm water drainage systems for the urban areas. The Ministry of Environment & Forests has come out with guidelines for preparation of project reports under National River Conservation Plan (NRCP) and National Ganga River Basin Authority in December 2010 for abatement of pollution of rivers. There is a need to ensure that treated effluents from the STPs out falling into water bodies are such that the river or canal water is suitable for treatment in a conventional water treatment plant. In such a case the desirable BOD content should be 3 mg/L. In the absence of available dilution, tertiary treatment of sewage is a necessity. This approach has been adopted by us at Meinhardt India for the Preparation of Comprehensive Master Plan of Sewerage for the cities of Raipur, Ranchi where the DPRs have been approved by the state government for the city of Patna. Therefore, there is a need to encourage participation of both private and public sector in planning, development and management of water resources projects with a view to introduce innovative ideas, generate financial resources, and bring in better management practices.

Keeping this in mind, the government has taken several initiatives. The most ambitious plan for abatement of pollution of water was launched by the name of Ganga Action Plan. Launched on 14th June 1985 by the then Prime Minister, Shri Rajiv Gandhi, Ganga Action Plan is a holistic approach in a planned way in the direction of abatement of pollution and in turn to make our water bodies fit as a source of drinking water. Ganga Action Plan was followed by Yamuna Action Plan and now National River Conservation Plan. The pollution abatement works under NRCP presently cover identified polluted stretches of 39 major rivers in 185 towns spread over 20 States in the country. The growing concern over the issue was discussed at the third India International Water Summit held on 18 to 19 October 2012, Hotel Le Meridien, New Delhi, a workshop on Industrial Wastewater treatment and Water Usage Efficiency.

Speaking on the occasion, Mr. P K Jain, Technical Advisor, Meinhardt Group said:”Water is one of the most crucial elements in our national development planning for the 21st century. The proper management of our limited water resources will be essential to avoid growing conflicts and the possibility of social unrest in the country in times to come due to water scarcity. However, the water resources on the Earth are finite. This calls for a judicious and planned use of this finite natural resource. Four R’s which are of importance include Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Recover.”

At present, states generally plan, design and execute water supply schemes (and often operate them) through their State Departments (of Public Health Engineering or Rural Development Engineering) or State Water Boards. The Central Government assists the states by giving financial support for the centrally sponsored schemes. In order that the schemes are prepared to adopt a uniform approach, the Ministry of Urban Development has issued two manuals on water supply and treatment and on sewerage and sewage treatment.

These manuals serve as a very good guide for planning and designing of water supply systems for urban and rural population and for sewerage and storm water drainage systems for the urban areas.

The Ministry of Environment & Forests has come out with guidelines for preparation of project reports under National River Conservation Plan (NRCP) and National Ganga River Basin Authority in December 2010 for abatement of pollution of rivers.

There is a need to ensure that treated effluents from the STPs out falling into water bodies are such that the river or canal water is suitable for treatment in a conventional water treatment plant. In such a case the desirable BOD content should be 3 mg/L. In the absence of available dilution, tertiary treatment of sewage is a necessity. This approach has been adopted by us at Meinhardt India for the Preparation of Comprehensive Master Plan of Sewerage for the cities of Raipur, Ranchi where the DPRs have been approved by the state government for the city of Patna. Therefore, there is a need to encourage participation of both private and public sector in planning, development and management of water resources projects with a view to introduce innovative ideas, generate financial resources, and bring in better management practices.